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Patients' experiences of cardiology procedures using minimal conscous sedation

journal contribution
posted on 2008-01-01, 00:00 authored by Lenore LeyLenore Ley, Mari BottiMari Botti, Maxine DukeMaxine Duke
Aim: The study's purpose was to describe patients' experiences of minimal conscious sedation during diagnostic and interventional cardiology procedures.

Methods:
Over a 6-week period, 119 consecutive patients (10% of annual throughput) from a major metropolitan hospital in Melbourne, Australia, were interviewed using a modified version of the American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire. Patients identified pain severity using a 10-point visual analogue scale and rated their overall comfort on a 6-point Likert scale ranging from very comfortable to very uncomfortable.

Results: Patients were aged 67.6 years (standard deviation 11.1), 70.8% were male, and the mean body mass index was 27.7 (standard deviation 4.8). Patients underwent diagnostic coronary angiography (67.5%), percutaneous coronary interventions (13.3%), or combined procedures (19.2%). Most patients (65%) were comfortable in the context of low-dose conscious sedation. Slight discomfort was reported by 26% of patients; 9% reported feeling uncomfortable primarily as a result of a combination of musculoskeletal pain, angina, and vasovagal symptoms experienced during the procedure. There was significant correlation (rho = .25, P = .01) between procedure length and patients' report of overall comfort, suggesting longer procedures were less comfortable for patients.

Conclusions:
The minimal sedation protocol was effective for the majority of patients; however, 9% of patients experienced significant discomfort related to preexisting conditions, highlighting the need for individual patient assessment before, during, and after the procedure.

History

Journal

Heart and lung : the journal of acute and critical care

Volume

37

Issue

3

Pagination

196 - 204

Publisher

Mosby, Inc.

Location

St. Louis, Mo.

ISSN

0147-9563

eISSN

1527-3288

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2008, Mosby