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Patterns of genetic variation in Pinus chiapensis, a threatened Mexican pine, detected by RAPD and mitochondrial DNA RFLP markers

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posted on 2002-09-01, 00:00 authored by A C Newton, Theodore Allnutt, W S Dvorak, R F Del Castillo, R A Ennos
Pinus chiapensis (Pinaceae) is a large conifer, endemic to central and southern Mexico and north-western Guatemala. In order to assess the extent of genetic variation within and between populations of this species, samples were obtained from throughout the natural range and analysed using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and mtDNA RFLPs markers. Probes for the CoxI mitochondrial gene enabled two mitotypes to be observed. Populations from the eastern and western limit of the range of the species were fixed for one mitotype ('A'), whereas two populations distributed near the centre of the range were fixed for another ('B'). When the samples were screened with eight 10-mer RAPD primers, a total of 12 polymorphic bands were detected. The proportion of polymorphic bands was unusually low (24.5%) compared with other tree species. AMOVA analysis indicated that a significant proportion of the variation (P < 0.002) was distributed between populations; the extent of population differentiation detected (Phi(st) = 0.226; G(ST ) = 0.194) was exceptionally high for a pine species. Pair-wise comparison of Phi(st) values derived from AMOVA indicated that populations were significantly (P < 0.05) different from each other in virtually every case. These results are interpreted in the context of the evolutionary history of the species, and the implications for its in- and ex situ conservation are discussed.

History

Journal

Heredity

Volume

89

Pagination

191 - 198

Publisher

Nature Publishing Group

Location

London, Eng.

ISSN

0018-067X

eISSN

1365-2540

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2002, Nature Publishing