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Perceptions and attitudes of land managers in multi-tenure reserve networks and the implications for conservation

journal contribution
posted on 01.01.2007, 00:00 authored by James FitzsimonsJames Fitzsimons, Geoffrey WescottGeoffrey Wescott
Multi-tenure reserve networks aim to connect areas managed for biodiversity conservation across public and private land and address the impacts of fragmentation on both biotic and social systems. The operation and function of Australian multi-tenure reserve networks as perceived by their land managers was investigated. Overall, the conservation of natural assets was the most frequently reported primary reason for involvement in a network. The perceived aims of the respective networks largely reflected the response identified for involvement and management. Over 88% of managers considered their involvement in multi-tenure reserve networks to be a positive or very positive experience. A lack of resources and time for management were considered major limitations of these networks. The majority (80%) of private land managers within networks were willing to be included in a national reserve system of conservation lands. As the Australian National Reserve System currently incorporates mostly public land, these findings have important and potentially positive implications for a greater role for protected private land.

History

Journal

Journal of environmental management

Volume

84

Issue

1

Pagination

38 - 48

Publisher

Elsevier

Location

Oxford, England

ISSN

0301-4797

eISSN

1095-8630

Language

eng

Notes

To obtain full text, please contact the author at jfitzsimons@tnc.org

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2006, Elsevier Ltd