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Personality and the emergence of the pace-of-life syndrome concept at the population level

journal contribution
posted on 2010-12-01, 00:00 authored by D Reale, D Garant, M Humphries, P Bergeron, Vincent Careau, P O Montiglio
The pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis specifies that closely related species or populations experiencing different ecological conditions should differ in a suite of metabolic, hormonal and immunity traits that have coevolved with the life-history particularities related to these conditions. Surprisingly, two important dimensions of the POLS concept have been neglected: (i) despite increasing evidence for numerous connections between behavioural, physiological and life-history traits, behaviours have rarely been considered in the POLS yet; (ii) the POLS could easily be applied to the study of covariation among traits between individuals within a population. In this paper, we propose that consistent behavioural differences among individuals, or personality, covary with life history and physiological differences at the within-population, interpopulation and interspecific levels. We discuss how the POLS provides a heuristic framework in which personality studies can be integrated to address how variation in personality traits is maintained within populations.

History

Journal

Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society B: biological sciences

Volume

365

Issue

1560

Pagination

4051 - 4063

Publisher

Royal Society Publishing

Location

London, England

ISSN

0962-8436

eISSN

1471-2970

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2010, Royal Society Publishing

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