File(s) not publicly available

Plant traits that enhance pollutant removal from stormwater in biofiltration systems

journal contribution
posted on 01.01.2010, 00:00 authored by J Read, T D Fletcher, Tricia WevillTricia Wevill, A Deletic
Plants species have been shown to improve the performance of stormwater biofiltration systems, particularly in removal of N and P. Recent research has shown that plants vary in their contribution to pollutant removal but little is known about the type of plant that is best suited to use in biofilters in terms of survival, growth rate, and performance. In this study, growth responses of 20 species to applications of semi-synthetic stormwater were measured, and the roles of key plant traits in removal of N, P, and several metals were investigated. There was no evidence of negative effects of stormwater application on plant growth, and plant traits, particularly root traits, were strongly correlated negatively with N and P concentrations of effluent stormwater. The most common and strong contributors to N and P removal appeared to be the length of the longest root, rooting depth, total root length, and root mass. The plants that made the strongest contribution to pollutant removal, e.g, Carex appressa, combined these traits with high growth rates. Investigation of other plant traits (e.g, physiology), causal mechanisms, and effects of more complex planting environments (e.g, species mixtures) should further guide the selection of plants to enhance performance of biofiltration systems.

History

Journal

International journal of phytoremediation

Volume

12

Issue

1

Pagination

34 - 53

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Location

Abingdon, Eng.

ISSN

1522-6514

eISSN

1549-7879

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2010, Taylor & Francis