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Platelet supersensitivity to thrombin stimulation in depression: a possible mechanism for the association with cardiovascular mortality.

journal contribution
posted on 2000-07-01, 00:00 authored by Michael BerkMichael Berk, H Plein
The mortality risk associated with cardiovascular disease is significantly increased in patients with major depression and panic disorder. The mechanism of this phenomenon is unclear. Thrombin is responsible for platelet aggregation and shape change, and it plays a significant role in the development of thromboembolic events. In this study, we examined the platelet second messenger intracellular calcium response to thrombin stimulation in patients with major depression (n = 13), major depression after response to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT; n = 13), subsyndromal depression (n = 16), schizophrenia (n = 15), and control subjects (n = 65). Patients with major depression had significantly higher intracellular calcium responses to thrombin stimulation than control subjects, patients with subsyndromal depression, and patients with schizophrenia (p < 0.05). Electroconvulsive therapy did not significantly change this supersensitivity. This suggests that the platelet response to activation in patients with major depression is supersensitive. This study suggests a possible mechanism for the increased risk of cardiovascular disease that is seen in these two psychiatric disorders. The lack of difference between the control and subsyndromal depression groups appears to validate current diagnostic thresholds in depression. The failure of nonpharmacologic treatment to alter this marker suggests that it may be a trait marker of depression.

History

Journal

Clinical Neuropharmacology

Volume

23

Pagination

182-185

Location

UNITED STATES

ISSN

1537-162X

eISSN

1537-162X

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2000, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

Issue

4

Publisher

Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins