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Police perceptions of interviews involving children with intellectual disabilities: a qualitative inquiry

Version 2 2024-06-13, 07:40
Version 1 2014-10-27, 16:30
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-13, 07:40 authored by N Aarons, M Powell, J Browne
This study employed a qualitative method to explore the experiences of 20 police officers when interviewing children with intellectual disabilities. Three main themes were interpreted as representing challenges to the officers when interviewing special-needs children: police organizational culture, participants' perceptions of these children as interviewees, and prior information. Participants in this inquiry mentioned poor organizational priority within the police force for child abuse cases and children with intellectual disabilities, as well as inadequate support for interviewing skills development and maintenance. Participants also attempted to equalize these children by interviewing them in the same way as their mainstream peers. Finally, participants viewed interview preparation as influential in determining an interview's successful outcome, but recognized that preparedness could bias their interviewing techniques. Increased attention towards these issues will provide a basis for developing strategies to minimize such challenges and thus improve the quality of interviews with children with intellectual disabilities.

History

Journal

Policing & society

Volume

14

Pagination

269-278

Location

Abingdon, England

ISSN

1043-9463

eISSN

1477-2728

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2004, Taylor & Francis

Issue

3

Publisher

Routledge Taylor & Francis Group