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Predicting the potential for zoonotic transmission and host associations for novel viruses

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journal contribution
posted on 2022-11-11, 01:02 authored by PS Pandit, SJ Anthony, T Goldstein, KJ Olival, MM Doyle, NR Gardner, B Bird, WA Smith, D Wolking, K Gilardi, C Monagin, T Kelly, M Uhart, JH Epstein, C Machalaba, MK Rostal, P Dawson, E Hagan, A Sullivan, H Li, AA Chmura, A Latinne, C Lange, T O'Rourke, SH Olson, L Keatts, AP Mendoza, A Perez, CD de Paula, D Zimmerman, M Valitutto, M LeBreton, D McIver, Ariful Islam, V Duong, M Mouiche, Z Shi, P Mulembakani, C Kumakamba, M Ali, N Kebede, U Tamoufe, S Bel-Nono, A Camara, J Pamungkas, K Coulibaly, E Abu-Basha, J Kamau, S Silithammavong, J Desmond, T Hughes, E Shiilegdamba, O Aung, D Karmacharya, J Nziza, D Ndiaye, A Gbakima, Z Sijali, S Wacharapluesadee, EA Robles, B Ssebide, G Suzán, LF Aguirre, MR Solorio, TN Dhole, NTT Nga, PL Hitchens, DO Joly, K Saylors, A Fine, S Murray, W Karesh, P Daszak, JAK Mazet, CK Johnson
Host-virus associations have co-evolved under ecological and evolutionary selection pressures that shape cross-species transmission and spillover to humans. Observed virus-host associations provide relevant context for newly discovered wildlife viruses to assess knowledge gaps in host-range and estimate pathways for potential human infection. Using models to predict virus-host networks, we predicted the likelihood of humans as hosts for 513 newly discovered viruses detected by large-scale wildlife surveillance at high-risk animal-human interfaces in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Predictions indicated that novel coronaviruses are likely to infect a greater number of host species than viruses from other families. Our models further characterize novel viruses through prioritization scores and directly inform surveillance targets to identify host ranges for newly discovered viruses

History

Journal

Communications biology

Volume

5

Article number

844

Pagination

1-10

Location

London, Eng.

Open access

  • Yes

ISSN

2399-3642

eISSN

2399-3642

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

1

Publisher

Nature Publishing Group