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Prevalence and patterns of problematic alcohol use among Australian parents

journal contribution
posted on 01.10.2010, 00:00 authored by E Maloney, Delyse HutchinsonDelyse Hutchinson, L Burns, R Mattick
OBJECTIVE: Limited research data exists on the prevalence, and characteristics associated with parental alcohol use, particularly in Australia. This study aims to examine the drinking patterns of Australian parents, and to determine whether the drinking pattern differs by family type. The characteristics associated with regular parental alcohol use were also assessed. METHODS: Data from a representative sample of 23,356 Australians were analysed from the 2007 National Drug Strategy Household Survey. RESULTS: The study found that parents were less likely to drink at levels defined as risky. Additionally, single mothers were more likely to report monthly and weekly binge drinking, compared to other mothers. Four predictors of risky parental alcohol use were identified: male; a current tobacco smoker; reporting higher levels of psychological distress; and lower levels of education. CONCLUSIONS: Although this study found that parents were less likely to consume alcohol at risky levels, population estimates suggest a considerable number of Australian children live in households where risky parental alcohol use occurs. IMPLICATIONS: This study provides the first step to extending the knowledge base on the prevalence of parental alcohol use which will help to inform public health policy and early intervention programs.

History

Journal

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health

Volume

34

Issue

5

Pagination

495 - 501

Publisher

Wiley

Location

London, Eng.

ISSN

1326-0200

eISSN

1753-6405

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2010, Public Health Association of Australia