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Prevalence of and characteristics associated with persistent smoking among Australian mothers and fathers: findings from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC)

journal contribution
posted on 01.08.2010, 00:00 authored by E Maloney, Delyse HutchinsonDelyse Hutchinson, L Burns, R Mattick
The study aimed to examine the prevalence, patterns and characteristics of continued tobacco smoking among Australian parents. The study utilised data from Wave 1 and Wave 2 of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). Smoking was reported by 20% of mothers and 25% of fathers at Wave 1 (with a slight decrease at Wave 2). Continued smoking was more likely among parents who were younger, less educated, reported problematic alcohol use, more financial problems and had a partner who smoked. The study estimated at the Australian population level, 29,649 children under the age of 1, and 36,208 children aged 4-5 years live in a household where smoking occurs inside. The prevalence of parental smoking remains considerable, despite an increasing awareness of the adverse effects. Reducing the number of adults who smoke inside the home with dependent children is an important public health concern in urgent need of attention.

History

Journal

Journal of family studies

Volume

16

Issue

2

Pagination

165 - 175

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Location

Abingdon, Eng.

ISSN

1322-9400

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2010, eContent Management