File(s) under permanent embargo

Prevention of suicide : police powers, parliamentary intent and judicial interpretation

journal contribution
posted on 01.05.2009, 00:00 authored by Danuta MendelsonDanuta Mendelson
While in most countries suicide is no longer a crime, it is also acknowledged that the state has an interest in the preservation of human life, prevention of suicide, and protection of vulnerable persons from harming themselves. In a civil, secular and democratic society, however, the public law principle of state protective powers has to be balanced against the private law principle of personal autonomy (personal self-determination). Under the doctrine of autonomy, competent adults of sound mind can make legally binding voluntary choices, including the so-called ‘death-choice’ (refusal of life-sustaining or life-prolonging treatment as well as suicide). To add to the complexity, whereas the powers of the state in relation to suicide and its prevention have been codified, the concepts of personal autonomy and personal liberty are grounded in common law. Stuart v Kirkland–Veenstra [2008] VSCA 32, which is at present being considered by the High Court of Australia, exemplifies tensions that arise in the suicide-prevention area of jurisprudence. This article explores powers and duties of police officers in relation to suicide prevention and the notion of mental illness by reference to the Kirkland–Veenstra case, the relevant statutory framework and the common law.

History

Journal

Journal of law and medicine

Volume

16

Issue

5

Pagination

728 - 744

Publisher

Lawbook Co

Location

North Ryde, N.S.W.

ISSN

1320-159X

Language

eng

Notes

Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal; C Journal article

Copyright notice

2010, Thomson Reuters

Usage metrics

Categories

Exports