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Promoting a team ball game (Lifeball) to older people : who does this game attract and who continues?

journal contribution
posted on 01.08.2009, 00:00 authored by S Green, E Campbell, Lisa BarnettLisa Barnett, R Mitchell, D Radvan, E Van Beurden
Issue addressed: To describe the demographic and health-related characteristics (physical activity, self-reported health status, quality of life and falls history) of older people who enroll in a team-based game, Lifeball, and examine associations between continuation and participant characteristics. Reasons for stopping, participants' perceptions of the game and changes in health-related characteristics over 12 months were examined.

Methods: Telephone surveys were conducted with a cohort of Lifeball players at: baseline, soon after commencing playing and 12 months later.

Results:
At baseline, participants were aged 40 to 96 years (mean 67). Most were female (84%), in good to excellent health (86%) and reported being sufficiently (>150 minutes per week) physically active (69%). Almost half (43%) were still playing 12 months later (continuers). Continuers were more likely to perceive Lifeball had helped them to: feel fitter and healthier (91%); improve their social life (73%); and be more active (53%). No significant changes in continuers' physical activity, self-reported health status and quality of life measures were reported. The main reason for stopping playing was illness/injury unrelated to Lifeball.

Conclusions:
Lifeball mainly appealed to healthy, active older people.

History

Journal

Health promotion journal of Australia

Volume

20

Issue

2

Pagination

120 - 126

Publisher

Australian Health Promotion Association

Location

West Perth, W.A.

ISSN

1036-1073

eISSN

1753-6405

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal; C Journal article

Copyright notice

2009, Australian Health Promotion Association