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Prosocial behavior relates to the rate and timing of cortical thinning from adolescence to young adulthood

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journal contribution
posted on 01.12.2019, 00:00 authored by L Ferschmann, Nandi VijayakumarNandi Vijayakumar, H Grydeland, K Overbye, D Sederevicius, P Due-Tønnessen, A M Fjell, K B Walhovd, J H Pfeifer, C K Tamnes
© 2019 Prosocial behavior, or voluntary actions that intentionally benefit others, relate to desirable developmental outcomes such as peer acceptance, while lack of prosocial behavior has been associated with several neurodevelopmental disorders. Mapping the biological foundations of prosociality may thus aid our understanding of both normal and abnormal development, yet how prosociality relates to cortical development is largely unknown. Here, relations between prosociality, as measured by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (self-report), and changes in thickness across the cortical mantle were examined using mixed-effects models. The sample consisted of 169 healthy individuals (92 females) aged 12–26 with repeated MRI from up to 3 time points, at approximately 3-year intervals (301 scans). In regions associated with social cognition and behavioral control, higher prosociality was associated with greater cortical thinning during early-to-middle adolescence, followed by attenuation of this process during the transition to young adulthood. Comparatively, lower prosociality was related to initially slower thinning, followed by comparatively protracted thinning into the mid-twenties. This study showed that prosocial behavior is associated with regional development of cortical thickness in adolescence and young adulthood. The results suggest that the rate of thinning in these regions, as well as its timing, may be factors related to prosocial behavior.

History

Journal

Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience

Volume

40

Article number

100734

Pagination

1 - 8

Publisher

Elsevier

Location

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

ISSN

1878-9293

eISSN

1878-9307

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal