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Psychopathology and episodic future thinking: a systematic review and meta-analysis of specificity and episodic detail

journal contribution
posted on 2018-03-01, 00:00 authored by David HallfordDavid Hallford, David AustinDavid Austin, K Takano, F Raes
Episodic future thinking (EFT) refers to the mental simulation of future events that might be personally-experienced; a crucial mental process in adaptation. Psychiatric disorders are associated with deficits in recalling episodic memory, however, no study has reviewed the empirical literature to assess for similar deficits in EFT. A systematic review comparing psychiatric groups with control groups on the specificity and episodic detail of EFT returned 19 eligible studies. An overall effect of g = -0.84 (95%CI = -1.06, - 0.62, p < .001) indicated individuals with a psychiatric diagnosis have significantly less specific and detailed EFT. Publication bias was not detected, but heterogeneity was. No methodological characteristics were significant moderators. Subgroup analyses showed significant effects for depression (g = -0.79, p < .001, k = 7), bipolar disorder (g = -1.00, p < .001, k = 2), and schizophrenia (g = -1.06, p < .001, k = 6), but not posttraumatic stress disorder (g = -1.04, p = .260, k = 2) or complicated grief (g = -0.41, p = .08, k = 2). Deficits in EFT are apparent in some psychiatric disorders. However, many clinical groups are understudied, and the causal mechanisms and remediation of these deficits require further research attention.

History

Journal

Behaviour research and therapy

Volume

102

Pagination

42-51

Location

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

ISSN

0005-7967

eISSN

1873-622X

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2018, Elsevier Ltd.

Publisher

Elsevier