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Race, history, and the Australian faith missions

journal contribution
posted on 2010-12-01, 00:00 authored by Joanna CruickshankJoanna Cruickshank
In 1901, the parliament of the new Commonwealth of Australia passed a series of laws designed, in the words of the Prime Minister Edmund Barton, “to make a legislative declaration of our racial identity”. An Act to expel the large Pacific Islander community in North Queensland was followed by a law restricting further immigration to applicants who could pass a literacy test in a European language. In 1902, under the Commonwealth Franchise Act, “all natives of Asia and Africa” as well as Aboriginal people were explicitly denied the right to vote in federal elections. The “White Australia policy”, enshrined in these laws, was almost universally supported by Australian politicians, with only two members of parliament speaking against the restriction of immigration on racial grounds.

History

Journal

Itinerario : international journal on the history of European expansion and global interaction

Volume

34

Issue

3

Season

Special Issue 03 (Missions and Modernity)

Pagination

39 - 52

Publisher

Cambridge University Press

Location

Cambridge, England

ISSN

0165-1153

eISSN

2041-2827

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2010, Research Institute for History, Leiden University

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