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Recording therapy sessions: what do clients and therapists really think?

Version 2 2024-06-13, 11:08
Version 1 2018-07-09, 12:03
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-13, 11:08 authored by E Brown, N Moller, C Ramsey-Wade
Aims: Recording therapy sessions has become part of routine practice amongst trainee psychotherapists. To date most research has focused on the benefits of recording sessions to support clinical supervision. There are few data about the benefits or risks for clients. This study aimed to explore the views of clients who had had their therapy sessions recorded and therapists who had recorded sessions. Design: Five clients and 25 therapists completed a qualitative survey, the results of which were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings: All clients and several therapists reported that the recording devices are soon forgotten. Both therapists and clients reported the benefits of recording as being purely for the therapist with none identified for clients. Conclusions: It was observed that clients perhaps did not always understand how recordings were used, suggesting the need for clearer practice guidance. © 2013 British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy.

History

Journal

Counselling and psychotherapy research

Volume

13

Pagination

254-262

Location

Chichester, Eng.

ISSN

1473-3145

eISSN

1746-1405

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2013, British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy

Issue

4

Publisher

Wiley

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