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Reducing children's classroom sitting time using sit-to-stand desks: Findings from pilot studies in UK and Australian primary schools

Version 2 2024-06-04, 00:45
Version 1 2015-06-18, 10:14
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-04, 00:45 authored by SA Clemes, SE Barber, DD Bingham, Nicky RidgersNicky Ridgers, E Fletcher, N Pearson, Jo SalmonJo Salmon, David DunstanDavid Dunstan
BACKGROUND: This research examined the influence of sit-to-stand desks on classroom sitting time in primary school children. METHODS: Pilot controlled trials with similar intervention strategies were conducted in primary schools in Melbourne, Australia, and Bradford, UK. Sit-to-stand desks replaced all standard desks in the Australian intervention classroom. Six sit-to-stand desks replaced a bank of standard desks in the UK intervention classroom. Children were exposed to the sit-to-stand desks for 9-10 weeks. Control classrooms retained their normal seated desks. Classroom sitting time was measured at baseline and follow-up using the activPAL3 inclinometer. RESULTS: Thirty UK and 44 Australian children provided valid activPAL data at baseline and follow-up. The proportion of time spent sitting in class decreased significantly at follow-up in both intervention groups (UK: -9.8 ± 16.5% [-52.4 ± 66.6 min/day]; Australian: -9.4 ± 10% [-43.7 ± 29.9 min/day]). No significant changes in classroom sitting time were observed in the UK control group, while a significant reduction was observed in the Australian control group (-5.9 ± 11.7% [-28.2 ± 28.3 min/day]). CONCLUSIONS: Irrespective of implementation, incorporating sit-to-stand desks into classrooms appears to be an effective way of reducing classroom sitting in this diverse sample of children. Longer term efficacy trials are needed to determine effects on children's health and learning.

History

Journal

Journal of Public Health

Volume

38

Pagination

526-533

Location

England

Open access

  • Yes

ISSN

1741-3842

eISSN

1741-3850

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal, C Journal article

Copyright notice

2015, Oxford University Press (OUP)

Issue

3

Publisher

OXFORD UNIV PRESS