Deakin University
Browse

File(s) under permanent embargo

Reducing stress and burnout in the public-sector work environment: a mindfulness meditation pilot study

journal contribution
posted on 2019-04-01, 00:00 authored by Elizabeth Vella, Shane McIverShane McIver
ISSUE ADDRESSED: Identifying ways to manage the psychological and emotional costs of workplace stress is essential. Mindfulness meditation is reported to support mental well-being; however, findings are limited in Australian business settings. Accordingly, this study explored the efficacy of a mindfulness meditation program tailored for an Australian public-sector workplace. METHODS: A mixed-methods, single-group, pre-/post-test design was used to evaluate a proof-of-concept mindfulness intervention. Quantitative measures included the Perceived Stress Scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory. Survey data were collected to analyse participant experiences. Participants (n = 65) were recruited from a government organisation. The 8-week program ran weekly for 45 minutes and had a 65% retention rate. Resources were provided to support home practice. RESULTS: Statistically significant decreases were obtained for perceived stress (d = 0.8) and emotional exhaustion (d = 0.4). Themes from qualitative findings suggested participants experienced an increased recognition of stress triggers, increased ability to detach from stressors, increased calmness and increased ability to prioritise work. CONCLUSIONS: Qualitative results extend comparable quantitative research by detailing how an appropriately tailored 8-week meditation-based program has the potential to decrease perceived stress in highly stressful work environments. SO WHAT?: Triangulated data suggest that an appropriately adapted mindfulness meditation program can be an effective, efficient and low-cost inclusion within an organisation's health promotion repertoire to help increase mental health among staff.

History

Journal

Health promotion journal of Australia

Volume

30

Pagination

219-227

Location

Chichester, Eng.

ISSN

1036-1073

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2018, Australian Health Promotion Association

Issue

2

Publisher

Wiley

Usage metrics

    Research Publications

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC