File(s) under permanent embargo

Rethinking inequalities between deindustrialisation, schools and educational research in Geelong

Inequalities have historically been conceptualised and empirically explored with primary reference to the human. Both measurements of educational inequalities through the production of data about students, teachers and schools, and ethnographic explorations of inequalities in the spoken accounts of human actors in schools can elide affective histories and material geologies of the earth that entwine with societal inequalities, and political questions of the relation between particular human bodies and the earth. In this article, we question: What might it do to rethink the concept of educational inequalities beyond human relations, from within a specific geographical territory? We seek to rethink inequalities including but exceeding these human relations; we argue that inequalities between humans, and between humans and the more-than-human, are materially generated and perpetuated. We offer three theoretical trajectories that consider the affective, spatial and material dimensions of inequality to rethink the relations between inequality, deindustrialisation and schooling. Educational research is implicated in the (re)production of inequalities, as well as having the potential to be part of the production of more equitable relations.

History

Journal

Educational philosophy and theory

Volume

51

Issue

4

Pagination

391 - 403

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Location

Abingdon, Eng.

ISSN

0013-1857

eISSN

1469-5812

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2018, Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia