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Role of multi-tenure reserve networks in improving reserve design and connectivity

journal contribution
posted on 30.04.2008, 00:00 authored by James FitzsimonsJames Fitzsimons, Geoffrey WescottGeoffrey Wescott
Multi-tenure reserve networks aim to connect areas managed for biodiversity conservation across public and private land. This paper seeks to determine to what extent multi-tenure reserve networks improve the reserve design and connectivity of the public protected area estate, using three networks in southeastern Australia as case studies. Network configuration varied considerably and those networks with generally larger parcels tended to be better connected. On average, public land components were larger than private land components in all networks. Two networks had 18 components physically adjoining other network components while another had only 6 components adjoining. Importantly for two of the networks, the average distance between the nearest neighbouring component was significantly less than average distances between public protected areas in the subregion. Thus these multi-tenure reserve networks acted to enhance the existing public protected area estate by increasing the potential linkages in the landscape and therefore the viability of individual public protected areas.

History

Journal

Landscape and urban planning

Volume

85

Issue

3-4

Pagination

163 - 173

Publisher

Elsevier B. V.

Location

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

ISSN

0169-2046

eISSN

1872-6062

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2007, Elsevier B.V.