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Role of nitric oxide in skeletal muscle glucose uptake during exercise

Version 2 2024-06-04, 12:56
Version 1 2018-06-13, 16:26
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-04, 12:56 authored by YH Hong, Andrew BetikAndrew Betik, GK McConell
Nitric oxide is produced within skeletal muscle fibres and has various functions in skeletal muscle. There is evidence that NO may be essential for normal increases in skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction/exercise. Although there have been some discrepant results, it has been consistently demonstrated that inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) attenuates the increase in skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction in mouse and rat muscle ex vivo, during in situ contraction in rats and during exercise in humans. The NO-mediated increase in skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction/exercise is probably due to the modulation of intramuscular signalling that ultimately increases glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation and is, surprisingly, independent of blood flow. In this review, we discuss the evidence for and against a role of NO in regulating skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction/exercise and outline the possible mechanism(s) involved. Emerging findings regarding the role of neuronal NOS mu (nNOSμ) in this process are also discussed.

History

Journal

Experimental physiology

Volume

99

Pagination

1569-1573

Location

Chichester, Eng.

ISSN

0958-0670

eISSN

1469-445X

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article, C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2014, The Authors

Issue

12

Publisher

John Wiley & Sons