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STN vs. pallidal stimulation in Parkinson disease: Improvement with experience and better patient selection

journal contribution
posted on 2006-01-01, 00:00 authored by A L Green, R G Bittar, P Bain, R B Scott, C Joint, R Gregory, T Z Aziz
Objectives. This is a prospective study to determine the outcomes of subthalamic nucleus (STN) vs. globus pallidus internus (GPi) deep brain stimulation (DBS) at our institution. Materials and Methods. We studied a total of 39 patients - 29 with STN and 10 with GPi DBS over a period of up to 6 years. Mean ages in the two groups were similar (59 and 60 years, respectively) and disease duration prior to implantation was similar (9.6 and 11.7 years, respectively). Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) was recorded preoperatively and at follow-up (at least at 6-month intervals). Medications also were recorded, and each patient's levodopa equivalent units (LEU) were calculated. Results were analyzed using a paired Student's t-test. Results. LEU reduced significantly (p < 0.05) in the STN group (5.7 to 3.7) but not the GPi group. Both targets significantly improved part 3 and part 4 scores of the UPDRS but GPi DBS did not improve part 2 scores (activities of daily living). STN DBS had much better outcome on the motor "off" scores of the UPDRS, whereas GPi only improved tremor. A comparison of the "earliest 10" and "most recent 10" STN patients showed a significant improvement in outcome in the most recent cases. Conclusions. In our group, STN was more effective for alleviating the symptoms of Parkinson disease, even in older patients with significant dyskinesias. Better patient selection and greater experience have led to more improvement in the more recent patients. © 2006 International Neuromodulation Society.

History

Journal

Neuromodulation

Volume

9

Issue

1

Pagination

21 - 27

ISSN

1094-7159

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