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Salt-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors (KABs) among victorian adults following 22-months of a consumer awareness campaign

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posted on 2020-05-01, 00:00 authored by Carley GrimesCarley Grimes, Ajam KhokharAjam Khokhar, Kristy BoltonKristy Bolton, K Trieu, J Potter, C Davidson, E K Dunford, S Jan, M Woodward, B Bolam, B Neal, Caryl NowsonCaryl Nowson, J Webster
The Australian population consumes more salt than recommended and this increases the risk of raised blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. In 2015, a state-wide initiative was launched in the Australian state of Victoria to reduce population salt intake. This study examines whether salt-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors (KABs) of Victorian adults changed following the first 22 months of a consumer awareness campaign targeting parents. Repeated cross-sectional surveys of adults (18–65 years) recruited from research panels. Analyses were weighted to reflect the Victorian population. In both surveys mean age of participants (1584 in 2015 and 2141 in 2018) was 41 years, and 51% were female. This includes 554 parents/caregivers in 2015 and 799 in 2018. Most indicators of KAB remained unchanged. Among parents/caregivers the percentage who agreed limiting salt in their child’s diet was important increased by 8% (p = 0.001), and there was a 10% reduction in the percentage who reported placing a saltshaker on the table and a 9% reduction in those who reported their child added salt at the table (both p < 0.001). Some small adverse effects on other indicators were also observed. During the first 22 months of a salt reduction consumer awareness campaign, there were limited changes in KAB overall, however the target audience reported positive changes regarding their children, which aligned with the campaign messages.

History

Journal

Nutrients

Volume

12

Issue

5

Article number

1216

Pagination

1 - 17

Publisher

MDPI

Location

Basel, Switzerland

ISSN

2072-6643

eISSN

2072-6643

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal