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Sedentary behaviour and hair cortisol amongst women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods: A cross-sectional study

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journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-18, 07:42 authored by Megan TeychenneMegan Teychenne, D Lee Olstad, Anne TurnerAnne Turner, Sarah CostiganSarah Costigan, Kylie BallKylie Ball
Women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods are at heightened risk of experiencing psychological stress. Therefore, identifying potential risk factors for stress is important to support positive mental health. A growing body of research has linked sedentary behaviour with mental ill-health (e.g., depression and anxiety); however, little research has specifically investigated potential linkages between sedentary behaviour and stress. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between common types of sedentary behaviour and objectively-measured stress (as measured by hair cortisol levels) amongst women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods. During 2012-2013, 72 women (aged 18-46 years) living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods self-reported sedentary behaviour (TV viewing, computer use, overall sitting time) and provided hair samples. Hair cortisol levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Linear regression models examined cross-sectional associations between sedentary behaviour and hair cortisol levels. There was no association between any type of sedentary behaviour (TV viewing, computer use, or overall sitting time) and hair cortisol levels in either crude or adjusted models. Sedentary behaviour may not be linked to hair cortisol level (stress) in women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Further studies utilising objective measures of both sedentary behaviour and stress are required to confirm these findings.

History

Journal

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Volume

15

Article number

ARTN 586

Pagination

1 - 8

Location

Switzerland

Open access

  • Yes

ISSN

1661-7827

eISSN

1660-4601

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2018, The Authors

Issue

4

Publisher

MDPI