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Shame proneness, shame coping, and functions of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among emerging adults: a developmental analysis

journal contribution
posted on 2018-06-01, 00:00 authored by S Mahtani, Glenn MelvinGlenn Melvin, P Hasking
Shame proneness (i.e., experiencing shame in a trait-like manner) and internalizing shame coping styles (e.g., withdrawing/attacking one’s self when feeling shame) predict distress, psychopathology, and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among emerging adults. Parental invalidation is instrumental in the development of both maladaptive shame and NSSI. In this study, we proposed that shame proneness and internalized shame coping would link perceived parental invalidation and psychological distress to NSSI functions among emerging adults. A sample of 384 Australian emerging adults with a history of NSSI (M age = 20.7 years, SD = 2.25; 81.3% female, 61.2% Caucasian) completed online self-reports assessing the relevant constructs. Hypothesized indirect effects through shame proneness and internalized shame coping were supported when participants reported using NSSI for intrapersonal (e.g., self-punishment), but not interpersonal (e.g., signaling autonomy), functions. Findings advance theories on why some young people engage in NSSI and implicate perceived parental invalidation and shame as potential clinical targets for NSSI. warranting further research.

History

Journal

Emerging adulthood

Volume

6

Pagination

159-171

Location

London, Eng.

ISSN

2167-6968

eISSN

2167-6984

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2017, Society for the Study of Emerging Adulthood and SAGE Publishing

Issue

3

Publisher

SAGE Publications

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