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Short-duration resistive exercise sustains neuromuscular function after bed rest

journal contribution
posted on 2012-09-01, 00:00 authored by U Gast, S John, M Runge, R Rawer, D Felsenberg, Daniel BelavyDaniel Belavy
PURPOSE: The study's purpose was to assess the effectiveness of a short-duration three-times-weekly high-load resistive exercise program on preventing deterioration in neuromuscular function after prolonged bed rest. METHODS: Twenty-four male subjects performed high-load resistive exercise (n = 8), high-load resistive exercise with whole-body vibration (n = 9), or no exercise (control, n = 9) during 60-d head-down tilt bed rest as part of the 2nd Berlin Bed Rest Study. Peak countermovement jump power and height, sit-to-stand performance, sprint time over 15 and 30 m, and leg press one-repetition maximum were measured before and after bed rest. RESULTS: The exercise interventions were capable of ameliorating losses of peak countermovement jump power (P < 0.001) and height (P < 0.001), deterioration of sit-to-stand time from 45-cm (P = 0.034) and 30-cm (P < 0.001) sitting positions, increases of 15-m (P = 0.037) and 30-m (P = 0.005) sprint time, and losses of leg press one-repetition maximum (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The short-duration (6-min time under tension per training session) exercise countermeasure program performed three times a week was capable of reducing the effect of prolonged bed rest on many neuromuscular function measures.

History

Journal

Medicine and science in sports in exercise

Volume

44

Issue

9

Pagination

1764 - 1772

Publisher

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Location

Baltimore, Md.

eISSN

1530-0315

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article; C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2012, American College of Sports Medicine