Deakin University
Browse

File(s) under permanent embargo

Starch in aquafeeds: The benefits of a high amylose to amylopectin ratio and resistant starch content in diets for the carnivorous fish, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

Version 2 2024-06-06, 05:22
Version 1 2020-08-18, 13:18
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-06, 05:22 authored by S Li, C Sang, GM Turchini, A Wang, J Zhang, N Chen
AbstractAquafeeds for carnivorous species face a nutritional–technological conundrum: containing sufficient starch to meet specific manufacturing requirements for binding, extrusion and expansion, but ideally containing as little starch as possible owing to their limited ability to utilise carbohydrates. The present study evaluated the effects of dietary starch with different amylose to amylopectin ratios and resistant starch contents on growth performance, hepatic glycogen accumulation and glucose metabolism of an important cultured carnivorous finfish, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). A common starch source (α-cassava starch (CS)) was tested as is or after being enzymatically de-branched at three different inclusion levels in diets for largemouth bass. Results showed that the increased dietary starch levels compromised performance and high dietary α-CS content led to obvious liver damage. However, the growth performances of fish fed the diets with de-branched starch (DS) were improved, and no manifest liver damages were observed even at the higher inclusion level. The increasing dietary starch contents significantly increased hepatic glycogen accumulation, but not when DS was used. High dietary starch content, without regard to starch sources, had no effect on the expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, except for down-regulation of insulin receptor expression. However, the use of dietary DS promoted the expression of genes involved in the insulin pathway and glycolysis. In conclusion, this study showed that the use of starch sources with a high amylose to amylopectin ratio and resistant starch in the feed for cultured carnivorous finfish could alleviate the hepatic glycogen deposition through regulating the insulin pathway and glycolysis.

History

Journal

British Journal of Nutrition

Volume

124

Article number

PII S0007114520002214

Pagination

1145-1155

Location

England

ISSN

0007-1145

eISSN

1475-2662

Language

English

Publication classification

C Journal article, C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

11

Publisher

CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS