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Student knowledge: curriculum, assessment and reporting

journal contribution
posted on 2015-11-18, 00:00 authored by Maria NicholasMaria Nicholas
At a time when national and international high-stakes testing has assumed such prominence, one might begin to wonder about the status of teacher judgement when assessing and reporting on children’s knowledge and skills against the descriptors specified in curriculum standards. Were standardised test results congruent with the judgements that teachers make when reporting on students’ achievement, concern about how one type of judgement might compare with another would perhaps be unwarranted. This article draws on research that has investigated whether standardised assessments in the state of Victoria, Australia are actually comparable with teacher’s judgements about their students’ work to illustrate that discrepancies do exist. These results have been interpreted within an analytical framework that derives from Aristotle’s (350BC/2000) distinction between three types of knowledge, namely epistemic, technical and phronetic knowledge.

History

Journal

Journal of educational enquiry

Volume

14

Issue

3

Pagination

1 - 16

Publisher

University of South Australia

Location

Adelaide, S. A.

ISSN

1444-5530

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal; C Journal article

Copyright notice

2015, University of South Australia