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Student perspectives on the value of experiential learning in history

journal contribution
posted on 2016-12-01, 00:00 authored by Cassandra AthertonCassandra Atherton, Glenn Moore
This paper is a reflective study of experiential learning as an American history teaching-tool. It is based on a survey of students who took a University of Melbourne study tour to the United States in the years from 2001–2011. This survey asked students to identify the tour’s long-term outcomes. The responses showed that students believed the study tour was beneficial academically, and that it also opened up employment opportunities. However, the most significant benefit identified by the students was positive social outcomes—in other words, the friends they made on the tour and the professional networks they formed. The conclusion we drew from these results was that students believe that experiential learning has a legitimate place in history curriculums, and that it is an antidote to the loneliness they feel in traditional classroom settings.

History

Journal

Australasian journal of American studies (AJAS)

Volume

35

Issue

2

Pagination

81 - 100

Publisher

Australian and New Zealand American Studies Association

Location

Melbourne, Vic.

ISSN

0705-7113

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article; C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2016, ANZASA and The United States Studies Centre

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Exports