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Studying immunity to zoonotic diseases in the natural host — keeping it real

journal contribution
posted on 2013-12-01, 00:00 authored by A G D Bean, M L Baker, C R Stewart, C Cowled, Celine Deffrasnes, L-F Wang, J W Lowenthal
Zoonotic viruses that emerge from wildlife and domesticated animals pose a serious threat to human and animal health. In many instances, mouse models have improved our understanding of the human immune response to infection; however, when dealing with emerging zoonotic diseases, they may be of limited use. This is particularly the case when the model fails to reproduce the disease status that is seen in the natural reservoir, transmission species or human host. In this Review, we discuss how researchers are placing more emphasis on the study of the immune response to zoonotic infections in the natural reservoir hosts and spillover species. Such studies will not only lead to a greater understanding of how these infections induce variable disease and immune responses in distinct species but also offer important insights into the evolution of mammalian immune systems.

History

Journal

Nature reviews: immunology

Volume

13

Issue

12

Pagination

851 - 861

Publisher

Nature Publishing Group

Location

London, Eng.

ISSN

1474-1733

eISSN

1474-1741

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article; C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2013, Macmillan Publishers