Deakin University
Browse

File(s) under permanent embargo

Subcortical volume analysis in traumatic brain injury: The importance of the fronto-striato-thalamic circuit in task switching

Version 2 2024-06-05, 06:42
Version 1 2020-01-30, 13:30
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-05, 06:42 authored by I Leunissen, JP Coxon, Karen CaeyenberghsKaren Caeyenberghs, K Michiels, S Sunaert, SP Swinnen
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with neuronal loss, diffuse axonal injury and executive dysfunction. Whereas executive dysfunction has traditionally been associated with prefrontal lesions, ample evidence suggests that those functions requiring behavioral flexibility critically depend on the interaction between frontal cortex, basal ganglia and thalamus.To test whether structural integrity of this fronto-striato-thalamic circuit can account for executive impairments in TBI we automatically segmented the thalamus, putamen and caudate of 25 patients and 21 healthy controls and obtained diffusion weighted images. We assessed components of executive function using the local-global task, which requires inhibition, updating and switching between actions.Shape analysis revealed localized atrophy of the limbic, executive and rostral-motor zones of the basal ganglia, whereas atrophy of the thalami was more global in TBI. This subcortical atrophy was related to white matter microstructural organization in TBI, suggesting that axonal injuries possibly contribute to subcortical volume loss. Global volume of the nuclei showed no clear relationship with task performance. However, the shape analysis revealed that participants with smaller volume of those subregions that have connections with the prefrontal cortex and rostral motor areas showed higher switch costs and mixing costs, and made more errors while switching. These results support the idea that flexible cognitive control over action depends on interactions within the fronto-striato-thalamic circuit. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

History

Journal

Cortex

Volume

51

Pagination

67-81

Location

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

ISSN

0010-9452

eISSN

1973-8102

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Publisher

Elsevier

Usage metrics

    Research Publications

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC