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Substance use to enhance academic performance among Australian university students

journal contribution
posted on 2013-09-01, 00:00 authored by J Mazanov, Matthew DunnMatthew Dunn, J Connor, M-L Fielding
Use of substances to enhance academic performance among university students has prompted calls for evidence to inform education and public health policy. Little is known about this form of drug use by university students outside the US. A convenience sample of n= 1729 Australian university students across four universities responded to an exploratory on-line survey. Students were asked about their lifetime use of modafinil, prescription stimulants (e.g. methylphenidate), supplements (e.g. ginkgo biloba), illicit drugs (e.g. speed), relaxants (e.g. valium) and caffeine in relation to enhancing study performance. The results show that Australian students report using substances for study purposes at a higher lifetime rate than observed among US or German students. The main reasons for use were to improve focus and attention, and to stay awake. Use of substances to enhance study outcomes was correlated with faculty of study, attitude and use of other substances. These results point to the need to develop Australian evidence to guide policy or regulatory responses to student use of substances to enhance academic performance. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

History

Journal

Performance enhancement and health

Volume

2

Pagination

110-118

Location

Amsterda, The Netherlands

ISSN

2211-2669

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article, C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2013, Elsevier

Issue

3

Publisher

Elsevier