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Suitability of remediated PFAS-affected soil in cement pastes and mortars

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Version 2 2024-06-04, 08:43
Version 1 2020-05-31, 15:54
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-04, 08:43 authored by A Fehervari, Will GatesWill Gates, C Gallage, Frank CollinsFrank Collins
Australia and many other parts of the world face issues of contamination in groundwater and soils by per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). While the pyrolytic treatment of contaminated soils can destroy PFAS, the resulting heat-treated soils currently have limited applications. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of remediated soils in concrete applications. Using heat-treated soil as a fine aggregate, with a composition and particle size distribution similar to that of traditional concrete sands, proved to be a straightforward process. In such situations, complete fine aggregate replacement could be achieved with minimal loss of compressive strength. At high fine aggregate replacement (≥ 60%), a wetting agent was required for maintaining adequate workability. When using the heat-treated soil as a supplementary cementitious material, the initial mineralogy, the temperature of the heat-treatment and the post-treatment storage (i.e., keeping the soil dry) were found to be key factors. For cement mortars where minimal strength loss is desired, up to 15% of cement can be replaced, but up to 45% replacement can be achieved if moderate strengths are acceptable. This study successfully demonstrates that commercially heat-treated remediated soils can serve as supplementary cementitious materials or to replace fine aggregates in concrete applications.

History

Journal

Sustainability (Switzerland)

Volume

12

Article number

ARTN 4300

Pagination

1 - 19

Location

Basel, Switzerland

eISSN

2071-1050

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2020, the authors

Issue

10

Publisher

MDPI