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Survival and growth of a high-mountain daisy transplanted outside its local range, and implications for climate-induced distribution shifts

Version 3 2024-06-19, 11:45
Version 2 2024-06-04, 08:52
Version 1 2023-10-23, 02:37
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-19, 11:45 authored by EE Sumner, JW Morgan, Susanna VennSusanna Venn, JS Camac
Abstract Field transplant experiments can improve our understanding of the effects of climate on distributions of plants versus a milieu of biotic factors which may be mediated by climate. We use a transplant experiment to test how survival and growth of a mountain-top daisy (Podolepis robusta), when planted within and outside its current local range, varies as a function of individual plant size, elevation, aspect and the presence of other vegetation. We expected a home-site advantage for the species, with highest survival and growth within the species’ current elevational limits, and a decline in vital rates above (due to physiological limitations) and below (due to competition with near-neighbours) these limits. Transplant survival during the beginning of the census was high (89 %), though by the third growing season, 36 % of initial transplants were remaining. Elevation had a significant negative effect on individual mortality rates; plants growing at higher elevations had a lower estimated hazard rate and thus, higher survival relative to those planted at elevations below the current lower limit of the distribution. By contrast, we detected no significant effect of elevation on growth rates. Small vegetation gaps had no effect on growth rates, though we found a negative, but non-significant, effect on mortality rates. Aspect had a very strong impact on growth. Plants transplanted to cool aspects had a significantly lower growth rate relative to transplants growing on a warm aspect. Conversely, aspect was not a significant predictor of individual mortality rates. Restrictions on the local distribution of P. robusta appear to be governed by mortality drivers at lower elevation and by growth drivers associated with aspect. We highlight that our ability to understand the drivers of distributions in current and future climates will be limited if contextual- and individual-level plant responses remain understudied.

History

Journal

AOB Plants

Volume

14

Article number

plac014

Pagination

1-10

Location

Oxford, Eng.

ISSN

2041-2851

eISSN

2041-2851

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

2

Publisher

Oxford University Press (OUP)

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