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Teachers' self-efficacy beliefs in teaching food and nutrition subjects in Australian secondary schools

journal contribution
posted on 2021-01-01, 00:00 authored by Janandani NanayakkaraJanandani Nanayakkara, Claire MargerisonClaire Margerison, F Worsley
Purpose – Teachers play important roles in school food and nutrition education. This study aims to explore Australian teachers' self-efficacy beliefs (i.e. belief in their own capabilities to perform specific teaching tasks) in teaching secondary school food and nutrition-related subjects. Design/methodology/approach – Teachers' overall self-efficacy beliefs in teaching these subjects (overall-SEB) and self-efficacy beliefs in teaching different food and nutrition-related topics (topics-SEB) were explored using a survey among 183 teachers in 2017. Principal components analysis derived three overall-SEB components: “Motivation and accommodation of individual differences”, “Classroom management” and “Communication and clarification” and three topics-SEB components: “Food system”, “Food and nutrition information” and “Food preparation”. Findings – Overall, higher percentages of teachers were confident or very confident in the majority of items that loaded on “Classroom management” and “Communication and clarification” compared to “Motivation and accommodation of individual differences”. Moreover, higher percentages of teachers were confident or very confident about items that loaded on “Food and nutrition information” and “Food preparation” compared” to “Food system”. The overall-SEB and topics-SEB were higher among more experienced teachers. There were moderate positive correlations between overall-SEB and topics-SEB components. Originality/value – The exploration of broader aspects of self-efficacy beliefs related to teaching secondary school food and nutrition-related subjects makes this study unique. The findings highlight that these teachers had high self-efficacy beliefs in teaching food and nutrition education, but there are gaps in tailoring the teaching process to meet the diverse needs of students and teaching broader food-related topics.

History

Journal

Health education

Volume

121

Issue

3

Pagination

311 - 321

Publisher

Emerald Publishing Limited

Location

Bingley, Eng.

ISSN

0965-4283

eISSN

1758-714X

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal