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The Dominance of Fandom: An Analysis of How Gender and Fandom Impact Live and Non-Live Sport Event Consumption Behaviours

journal contribution
posted on 2024-05-09, 03:33 authored by H Kennedy, Jordan BakhshJordan Bakhsh, A Pegoraro, M Taks
This quantitative study featuring a representative sample from four Canadian regions (n = 1,011) investigates the impact of fandom and gender on 12 consumption behaviors pertaining to the 2019 NBA Championships. To analyze the panel survey results, multivariate multiple and ordinal probit regressions were used to measure the impact of gender, fandom, and the gender-fandom interaction on live and non-live consumption behaviors respectively. Fandom significantly predicted all 12 consumption behaviors, while gender and the fandom-gender interaction only significantly impacted live television consumption. Specifically, men viewed more live games via television than women, driven in-large-part by non-fan men viewing more games than non-fan women. Results indicated fandom is the dominant driver of consumption, stressing its importance and inclusion within academic and marketing decisions, with gender playing a near negligible role. Yet, given live television viewing is a gateway consumption behavior, strategies targeting gender parity should target this consumption mode, particularly among non-fans.

History

Journal

Leisure Sciences

Volume

ahead-of-print

Pagination

1-24

Location

London, Eng.

ISSN

0149-0400

eISSN

1521-0588

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

ahead-of-print

Publisher

Taylor & Francis