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The MidPIC study: Midwives’ knowledge, perspectives and learning needs regarding preconception and interconception care

journal contribution
posted on 2024-05-09, 01:16 authored by Z Bradfield, E Leefhelm, SE Soh, KI Black, JA Boyle, L Kuliukas, C Harrison, CSE Homer, RM Smith, H Skouteris
Preconception and interconception care improves health outcomes of women and communities. Little is known about how prepared and willing Australian midwives are to provide preconception and interconception care. The aim of this study was to explore midwives’ knowledge, perspectives and learning needs, and barriers and enablers to delivering preconception and interconception care. We conducted a cross-sectional exploratory study of midwives working in any Australian maternity setting. An online survey measured midwives’ self-rated knowledge; education needs and preferences; attitudes towards pre and interconception care; and views on barriers, enablers; and, future service and workforce planning. Quantitative data were analysed descriptively and demographic characteristics (e.g., years of experience, model of care) associated with knowledge and attitudes regarding pre- and interconception care were examined using univariate logistic regression analysis. Qualitative data were captured through open-ended questions and analysed using inductive content analysis. We collected responses from (n = 338) midwives working across all models of care (full survey completion rate 96%). Most participants (n = 290; 85%) rated their overall knowledge about pre and interconception health as excellent, above average or average. Participants with over 11 years of experience were more likely to report above average to excellent knowledge (OR 3.11; 95% CI 1.09, 8.85). Online e-learning was the most preferred format for education on this topic (n = 244; 72%). Most (n = 257; 76%) reported interest in providing pre and interconception care more regularly and that this is within the midwifery scope of practice (n = 292; 87%). Low prioritisation in service planning was the most frequently selected barrier to providing preconception and interconception care, whereas continuity models and hybrid child health settings were reported as enablers of pre and interconception care provision. Findings revealed that midwives are prepared and willing to provide preconception and interconception care. Pre and post registration professional development; service and funding reform; and policy development are critical to enable Australian midwives’ provision of pre and interconception care.

History

Journal

PLoS ONE

Volume

18

Article number

e0289910

Pagination

1-20

Location

United States

ISSN

1932-6203

eISSN

1932-6203

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Editor/Contributor(s)

Bulto GA

Issue

11

Publisher

Public Library of Science (PLoS)