Deakin University
Browse

File(s) not publicly available

The Role of Metabolic Phenotype in the Capacity to Balance Competing Energetic Demands

journal contribution
posted on 2023-04-06, 05:45 authored by MJ Lawrence, H Scheuffele, SB Beever, PE Holder, CJ Garroway, SJ Cooke, Timothy ClarkTimothy Clark
Given the critical role of metabolism in the life history of all or-ganisms, there is particular interest in understanding the relationship between individual metabolic phenotypes and the capacity to partition energy into competing life history traits. Such relationships could be predictive of individual phenotypic performances through-out life. Here, we were specifically interested in whether an individual fish’s metabolic phenotype can shape its propensity to feed following a significant stressor (2-min exhaustive exercise challenge). Such a relationship would provide insight into pre-vious intraspecific observations linking high metabolism with faster growth. Using a teleost fish, the barramundi (Lates cal-carifer), we predicted that individuals with high standard metabolic rates (SMRs) and maximal metabolic rates (MMRs) would be faster to recover and resume feeding after exercise. Contrary to our prediction, neither SMR nor MMR was correlated with latency to feed after exercise (food was offered at 0.5, 1.5, 3, and 18 h after exercise). Only time after exercise and individual fish ID were significant predictors of latency to feed. Measurements of MMR from the same individuals (three measurements spaced 8–12 d apart) revealed a moderate degree of repeatability (R = 0:319). We propose that interindividual differences in biochemical and endocrine processes may be more influential than whole-organism metabolic phenotype in mediating feeding latency after exercise.

History

Journal

Physiological and Biochemical Zoology

Volume

96

Pagination

106-118

Location

United States

ISSN

1522-2152

eISSN

1537-5293

Language

en

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

2

Publisher

University of Chicago Press