clarke-theclimatechange-2006.pdf (810.94 kB)
Download file

The climate change and development nexus

Download (810.94 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 2006-02-01, 00:00 authored by Matthew ClarkeMatthew Clarke
The rapid economic success achieved by the developing countries in general, and India and China in particular, has brought the issue of climate change, which is a spin-off of development, to the fore. Economic growth is essential for the eradication of poverty and generation of wealth. However, it drives energy consumption and demand for energy which, in turn, produces toxic gases like carbon dioxide (CO2 ). Thus, the price of economic growth is climate change. The paradox lies in the fact that when economic growth is the only solution to poverty, the resultant climate change (characterized by emission of greenhouse gases) also affects the poor greatly. In this context, it is observed that while traditionally the developed countries were charged with polluting the environment globally, now the developing countries have overtaken their counterparts as polluters. The developing countries have emerged, over the years, as the agents responsible for growing pollution in the world, though they are also the victims, as most of the poor people belong to the developing countries. The author explores the nexus between climate change and development in the context of the economic growth of the developing countries and its impact on them.

History

Journal

ICFAI journal of environmental economics

Volume

4

Issue

1

Pagination

21 - 37

Publisher

ICFAI University Press

Location

India

ISSN

0972-9313

Language

eng

Notes

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in Deakin Research Online. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2006, ICFAI University Press

Usage metrics

Categories

Keywords

Exports