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The correlates of after-school sedentary behavior among children aged 5-18 years: A systematic review

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Version 2 2024-06-04, 01:57
Version 1 2016-02-01, 10:23
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-17, 17:18 authored by Lauren ArundellLauren Arundell, E Fletcher, Jo SalmonJo Salmon, Jenny VeitchJenny Veitch, T Hinkley
BACKGROUND: Children and adolescents spend a large proportion of the after-school period in sedentary behaviors (SB). Identifying context-specific correlates is important for informing strategies to reduce these behaviors. This paper systematically reviews the correlates of children's and adolescents' after-school SB. METHODS: A computerized literature search was performed in October 2015 for peer-reviewed original research journal articles published in English before October 2015. Eligibility criteria included: 1) sample aged 5-18 years; 2) quantified the amount of SB or component of this that the children/adolescents were performing after school; 3) a measure of SB as the dependent outcome; and 4) the association between potential correlates and after-school SB. RESULTS: Data were synthesized in October 2015. Thirty-one studies met the eligibility criteria: 22 studies among children (≤ 12 years), six among adolescents (>12 years), two had a combined sample of children and adolescents and one cohort followed children from childhood to adolescence. Findings were separated by after-school location i.e. after-school programs (n = 4 studies) and unidentified locations (n = 27). There was insufficient evidence to draw conclusions on all but two of the 58 potential correlates: sex and age. Among children at unidentified locations there was a null association between sex (male) and overall after-school SB, a null association between sex (male) and after-school TV viewing, a positive association between age and overall after-school SB and an inconsistent association between age and after-school TV viewing. No correlates of after-school sedentary behaviour while at after-school programs were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Only two correlates have been investigated frequently enough to determine an overall association; neither correlate is modifiable. Due to the lack of consistent investigation of potential correlates, further evidence is required to accurately identify potential intervention targets. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42014009180.

History

Journal

BMC Public Health

Volume

16

Article number

ARTN 58

Location

England

Open access

  • Yes

ISSN

1471-2458

eISSN

1471-2458

Language

English

Publication classification

C Journal article, C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2016, The Authors

Issue

1

Publisher

BMC