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The domestic labour of academic governance and the loss of academic voice

Version 2 2024-06-13, 10:34
Version 1 2017-05-15, 00:04
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-13, 10:34 authored by JM Rowlands
While academic governance does not produce teaching and research, it provides the conditions that enable them to take place. The principal academic governance body within universities, the academic board (also known as the academic senate or faculty senate), therefore plays a key role in enabling universities to conduct their core business. However, at the same time as doing things that are necessary, the role of academic boards has come to be seen as unimportant. This development is considered in light of empirical data from universities in the US, UK and Australia. The paper argues that university governance represents gendered relations and that the role of academic boards is now largely procedural – the equivalent of housework – invisible unless not done well. Moreover, ‘done well’ is defined not by academic boards themselves but by university executives, whose masculine, managerial roles both replicate and control traditional academic board functions.

History

Journal

Gender and education

Volume

31

Pagination

793-810

Location

Abingdon, Eng.

ISSN

0954-0253

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2017, Informa UK

Issue

7

Publisher

Routledge