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The effect of task load, information reliability and interdependency on anticipation performance

Version 2 2024-06-20, 00:46
Version 1 2024-04-18, 23:18
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-20, 00:46 authored by Colm P Murphy, Oliver R Runswick, N Viktor Gredin, David BroadbentDavid Broadbent
AbstractIn sport, coaches often explicitly provide athletes with stable contextual information related to opponent action preferences to enhance anticipation performance. This information can be dependent on, or independent of, dynamic contextual information that only emerges during the sequence of play (e.g. opponent positioning). The interdependency between contextual information sources, and the associated cognitive demands of integrating information sources during anticipation, has not yet been systematically examined. We used a temporal occlusion paradigm to alter the reliability of contextual and kinematic information during the early, mid- and final phases of a two-versus-two soccer anticipation task. A dual-task paradigm was incorporated to investigate the impact of task load on skilled soccer players’ ability to integrate information and update their judgements in each phase. Across conditions, participants received no contextual information (control) or stable contextual information (opponent preferences) that was dependent on, or independent of, dynamic contextual information (opponent positioning). As predicted, participants used reliable contextual and kinematic information to enhance anticipation. Further exploratory analysis suggested that increased task load detrimentally affected anticipation accuracy but only when both reliable contextual and kinematic information were available for integration in the final phase. This effect was observed irrespective of whether the stable contextual information was dependent on, or independent of, dynamic contextual information. Findings suggest that updating anticipatory judgements in the final phase of a sequence of play based on the integration of reliable contextual and kinematic information requires cognitive resources.

History

Journal

Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications

Volume

9

Article number

22

Pagination

1-16

Location

London, Eng.

ISSN

2365-7464

eISSN

2365-7464

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

1

Publisher

SpringerOpen