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The effects of episode similarity on children's reports of a repeated event

journal contribution
posted on 01.01.2019, 00:00 authored by Meaghan DanbyMeaghan Danby, Stefanie SharmanStefanie Sharman, Sonja Brubacher, Martine Powell
Much research has tested techniques to improve children's reporting of episodes from a repeated event by interviewing children after they have experienced multiple episodes of a scripted event. However, these studies have not considered any effects of the similarity shared between event episodes on children's reports. In the current study, 5- to 9-year-olds experienced four episodes of a scripted repeated event that shared a high (n = 76) or low (n = 76) degree of similarity, and were subsequently interviewed about individual episodes. The proportional amount and accuracy of children's reported details were tallied. Children reported proportionally more details and more script deviations after experiencing the high, compared to low, similarity event. Conversely, children were more accurate in their episodic reports when they experienced the low, compared to high, similarity event. The current findings have implications for the generalisability and comparability of past results across laboratory studies.

History

Journal

Memory

Volume

27

Issue

4

Pagination

561 - 567

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Location

Abingdon, Eng.

eISSN

1464-0686

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2018, Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group