File(s) not publicly available

The effects of target length on the visual control of step length for hard and soft impacts

journal contribution
posted on 01.01.2002, 00:00 authored by E Bradshaw, W Sparrow
Adjustments to gait were examined when positioning the foot within a narrow target at the end of an approach for two impact conditions, hard and soft. Participants (6 M, 6 F) ran toward a target of three lengths along a 10-m walkway consisting of two marker strips with alternating black and white 0.5-m markings. Five trials were conducted for each target length and impact task, with trials block randomized between the 6 participants of each gender. A 50-Hz digital video camera panned and filmed each trial from an elevated position adjacent to the walkway. Video footage was digitized to deduce the gait characteristics. A linear speed/accuracy tradeoff between target length and approach time was found for both impact tasks (hard, r = 0.99, p < 0.01; soft, r = 0.96, p < 0.05). For the hard-impact task, visual control time increased linearly (r = 0.99, p < 0.05) when whole-body approach velocity decreased. Visual control time was unaffected by whole-body approach velocity in the soft-impact task. A constant tau-margin of 1.08 describes the onset of visual control when approaching a target while running, with the control of braking during visual control described by a tau-dot of –0.85. Further research is needed to examine the control of braking in different targeting tasks.

History

Journal

Journal of applied biomechanics

Volume

18

Issue

1

Pagination

57 - 73

Publisher

Human Kinetics Publishers Inc

Location

Champaign, Il.

ISSN

1065-8483

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal