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The health burden of preventable disease in Australia: a systematic review

Version 2 2024-06-04, 00:54
Version 1 2019-03-07, 07:24
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-04, 00:54 authored by P Crosland, Jaithri AnanthapavanJaithri Ananthapavan, J Davison, M Lambert, Rob CarterRob Carter
OBJECTIVE: A systematic review was conducted to determine the health burden of preventable disease in Australia. METHODS: The PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement guidelines were followed to identify, screen and describe the protocols used in the systematic review. RESULTS: Eleven studies were included in the review. Data on the health burden associated with lifestyle-related risk factors were extracted by disease with outcomes reported in attributable number and proportion of deaths, years of life lost, years lived with disability and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Around one-third of DALYs was attributed to all modifiable risk factors. The range of estimates of DALYs attributable to each prioritised risk factor was: combined dietary risk factors, 7.2% to 9.7%; tobacco, 7.9% to 9.0%; alcohol, 5.1% to 12.2%; high body mass, 5.5% to 8.3%; and physical inactivity, 1.2% to 5.5%. CONCLUSIONS: Although the methods used to estimate preventable health burden varied greatly between studies, all found that a substantial amount of death and disability was attributable to lifestyle-related risk factors. Implications for public health: There is a large health burden in Australia caused by modifiable risk factors and further action is warranted to address this burden.

History

Journal

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health

Volume

43

Pagination

163-170

Location

Australia

Open access

  • Yes

ISSN

1326-0200

eISSN

1753-6405

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2019, The Authors

Issue

2

Publisher

WILEY