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The impact of breaking up prolonged sitting on glucose metabolism and cognitive function when sleep is restricted

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posted on 2018-01-01, 00:00 authored by G E Vincent, S M Jay, C Sargent, K Kovac, C Vandelanotte, Nicky RidgersNicky Ridgers, S A Ferguson
Objectives: To investigate the acute benefits of breaking up prolonged sitting with light-intensity physical activity on (i) glucose metabolism under conditions of sleep restriction, and (ii) cognitive deficits associated with sleep restriction. Methods: This counterbalanced, crossover trial consisted of two five-day (5 night) experimental conditions separated by a two-week washout period. On the first night, participants were given a 9-h sleep opportunity to allow the collection of steady-state baseline measures the following day. This was followed by three consecutive nights of sleep restriction (5-h sleep opportunity). In the sitting condition (SIT), participants remained seated between 1000 and 1800 h. In the physical activity condition (ACT), participants completed 3-min bouts of light-intensity walking every 30 min on a motorised treadmill between 1000 and 1800 h. At all other times, in both conditions, participants remained seated, except when walking to the dining room or to use the bathroom (max distance = 32 m). Six physically inactive, healthy males were randomised to one of two trial orders, 1) SIT then ACT, or 2) ACT then SIT. Continuous measures of interstitial glucose were measured at 5-min intervals. A cognitive and subjective test battery was administered every two hours during wake periods. Analyses were conducted using a series of linear mixed-effect ANOVAs. Results: No differences in interstitial glucose concentration or cognitive performance were observed between the SIT condition and the ACT condition. Participants reported higher levels of sleepiness, and felt less alert in the SIT condition compared with the ACT condition. Conclusions: There were no observable benefits of breaking up prolonged sitting on glucose metabolism under conditions of sleep restriction. These findings have implications for behaviour change interventions. Future studies will need to include larger, less homogenous study populations and appropriate control conditions (i.e., 8–9 h sleep opportunities).

History

Journal

Neurobiology of sleep and circadian rhythms

Volume

4

Pagination

17 - 23

Publisher

Elsevier

Location

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

ISSN

2451-9944

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2017, The Authors

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