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The impact of political skill on impression management effectiveness

journal contribution
posted on 2007-01-01, 00:00 authored by K J Harris, S Zivnuska, K M Kacmar, Jason Shaw
In this study, the authors investigated the effect of an individual's political skill on the relationships between 5 different impression management tactics (intimidation, exemplification, ingratiation, self-promotion, and supplication) and supervisor evaluations of performance. To test these relationships, the authors used a matched sample of 173 supervisor-subordinate dyads who worked full time in a state agency. Findings showed that individuals who used high levels of any of the tactics and who were politically skilled achieved more desirable supervisor ratings than did those who used the tactics but were not politically skilled. Opposite results were found when impression management usage was low. That is, individuals who were not politically skilled created a more desirable image in their supervisors' eyes than did their politically skilled counterparts when they did not use these tactics. Practical and research implications for the findings as well as directions for future research are offered.

History

Journal

Journal of Applied Psychology

Volume

92

Issue

1

Pagination

278 - 285

Publisher

American Psychological Association

Location

Washington, D.C.

ISSN

0021-9010

eISSN

1939-1854

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2007, American Psychological Association

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