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The management of subjective quality of life by short-stay hospital patients: an exploratory study

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posted on 2003-09-08, 00:00 authored by David MellorDavid Mellor, Robert CumminsRobert Cummins, E Karlinski, S Storer
Background: This study tested the homeostatic model of subjective quality of life in a group of 47 short stay patients as they progressed through the stages of hospitalization for surgery.
Method: Participants completed a questionnaire measuring subjective quality of life, positive and negative affect, self-esteem, optimism and cognitive flexibility, the day prior to admission (T1), two days post-operation (T2) and one week after discharge (T3). Neuroticism and Extroversion were measured at Time 1.
Results: All variables remained stable across the three times, apart from positive affect, which dropped significantly post-operation but returned to its previous level post discharge.
Conclusion: Although the homeostatic model of subjective quality of life was supported at Time 1, the analyses raise doubts about the stability of personality. This finding is consistent with recent discussions of personality.

History

Journal

Health and quality of life outcomes

Volume

1

Pagination

1 - 9

Location

London, England

Open access

  • Yes

ISSN

1477-7525

Language

eng

Notes

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal; C Journal article

Copyright notice

2003 Mellor et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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