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The meaning of anger for Australian Indigenous offenders : the significance of context

journal contribution
posted on 2006-10-01, 00:00 authored by Andrew Day, L Davey, R Wanganeen, K Howells, J DeSantolo, M Nakata
The problem of overrepresentation of Indigenous offenders in Australian prisons highlights the need for effective tertiary intervention programs within correctional settings as a way of reducing Indigenous reincarceration. This study seeks to explore meanings of anger within an Indigenous context that might inform the development of more acceptable and potentially more effective rehabilitation programs. A methodology that acknowledges the importance of narrative, context, and culture was devised to explore how anger as an emotion is understood and experienced by a group of Indigenous men in a South Australian prison. Although some of the major themes reflected experiences of anger common to many offenders, it was evident that for these Indigenous men, anger was experienced within a broad social and political context that imbued the experience of anger with layers of culturally specific meaning. It is suggested that these layers of meaning constitute sufficient difference to warrant further exploration.

History

Journal

International journal of offender therapy and comparative criminology

Volume

50

Issue

5

Pagination

520 - 539

Publisher

The Association

Location

London, England

ISSN

0306-624X

eISSN

1552-6933

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2006, Sage Publications

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