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The natural history of risky drinking and associated harms from adolescence to young adulthood: Findings from the Australian Temperament Project

Version 2 2024-06-05, 11:10
Version 1 2017-10-09, 14:56
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-05, 11:10 authored by KS Betts, R Alati, P Baker, Primrose LetcherPrimrose Letcher, Delyse HutchinsonDelyse Hutchinson, George YoussefGeorge Youssef, Craig OlssonCraig Olsson
BackgroundWe aimed to describe the natural history of heavy episodic drinking (HED) and associated harms from adolescence to young adulthood in a large Australian population cohort study.MethodThe Australian Temperament Project consists of mothers and babies (4–8 months) recruited from Infant Welfare Centres and followed every 2 to 4 years until age 28 years. Analyses were based on data from 1156 young people (497 male; 659 female) surveyed repeatedly at ages 16, 18, 20, 24 and 28 years. We used dual processes latent class growth analysis to estimate trajectories of HED and associated harms, employing a piecewise approach to model the hypothesized rise and subsequent fall across adolescence and the late twenties, respectively.ResultsWe identified four sex-specific trajectories and observed little evidence of maturing-out across the twenties. In males, a normative pattern of increasing HED across the twenties with little related harm was observed (40% of the male sample). Early and late starter groups that peaked in harms at age 20 years with only minor attenuation in binging thereafter were also observed (6.1% and 35%, respectively). In females, a normative pattern of increasing, but moderate, HED with little related harm was observed (44% of the female sample). Early and late starter groups were also identified (18% and 17%, respectively); however, unlike males, the female late starter group showed a pattern of increasing HED and related harms.ConclusionsContinued patterns of risky alcohol use and related harms are apparent for both males and females across the twenties.

History

Journal

Psychological Medicine

Volume

48

Pagination

23-32

Location

England

ISSN

0033-2917

eISSN

1469-8978

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal, C Journal article

Copyright notice

2017, Cambridge University Press

Issue

1

Publisher

CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS